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The Poshmark Series: Listing on Poshmark

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Welcome to the third installment of The Poshmark Series, where Iโ€™m walking yโ€™all through how to make some moolah on Poshmark. You can read the intro post here, and you can read about why I choose Poshmark over other selling platforms in this post here.

Check out my closet here, and sign up for Poshmark here with my code BWCTE for $5 credit towards your first purchase!ย 

It’s been awhile since I’ve posted anything in The Poshmark Series, but the more I talk to my friends about Poshmark, the more I realize how valuable my Poshmark knowledge is!

Last time I covered why I choose Poshmark over other selling platforms and today I’m going to walk you through one of the most important parts of Poshmark: listing your items to sell!

Let’s break this whole listing thing down into easy steps. Listing on Poshmark is actually pretty easy once you get the hang of it. I’m going to be really thorough, so stick with me, y’all! This is how I list.

ONE: GATHER ALL ITEMS TO LIST

Whether you’re attempting to earn a full-time income or just cleaning out your closet, you should first gather everything you want to list. For me, that doesn’t mean ALL of my unlisted inventory (or death pile as resellers call it), it just means what I want to get through in that listing session. I find that it’s best for me to get into a groove, so I’ll grab a pile of usually 20-25 items and bring them to where I’ll be photographing. Unfold them all and lay them flat on each other. It’s one less thing you have to do in the groove.

If you have items that desperately need to be ironed or steamed, this is when you should do that. You can get a steamer for around $20 but you probably already have an iron. Irons just stress me out ๐Ÿ˜‰ Once you start listing on Poshmark, it’s good to have everything photo-ready.

TWO: SET UP YOUR PHOTOS

If you look through my Poshmark closet, you’ll notice that I have a BUNCH of different photo layouts. Some were on a fuzzy blanket, some were on a white bedspread, some are hanging, some are on a white rug with a wood floor, and some are a white rug with a yellow rug behind it. I’m still figuring out the best way (for me) to take photos. I like hanging them, but I also don’t have the space to do that consistently. Find what works the very best for you, and get the area all set up. Move away any furniture or decor that gets in the way. Here are some of my favorite Posh closets for some inspiration for listing on Poshmark:

@alvictoria

I love her gold speckled wallpaper. It’s unique but still really classy + girly. Her flatlays for shoes + bags is really nicely done, as well.

 

@sydneyodelia

Sydney does a BEAUTIFUL job with flat lays!

 

Here’s what you’re looking for with your location for photos: LIGHT! Lots of natural light. Try to find or create a bright, clutter free space for your photos, regardless of if you’re hanging them or flat laying them. If you’re unable to find any natural light, you could invest in a lighting kit. That’s the next step for me, so that I can take photos that are bright and airy regardless of what is or isn’t coming through my window.

THREE: PHOTOGRAPH

For the first few months I only used the Poshmark app for taking photos, and now that I’ve stepped away from that I highly recommend taking photos with your camera app. For whatever reason, Poshmark doesn’t let you edit the orientation of your photos and sometimes the photos take sideways and you have to keep retaking them. By taking them with your camera app you can easily edit them, regardless of their orientation.

At a MINIMUM, I take 3 photos of each item: full-length front, close up of tag/size, full-length back. If there are any cute details (embroidery, ruffles, lace, beading, etc) I always include a close up of that as well.

If there is ANY damage to the item, take a photo of it. Snags, wear, tiny holes or stains. You can still sell the item damaged, but you need to disclose any and all wear. Photos make sure the buyer knows exactly what they’re getting.

Go through the pile, photographing each item. Once you’re done with that, it’s time to move on to actual listing.

FOUR: OPEN AND LIST ON POSHMARK

Since I’ve started selling on Poshmark, they’ve enabled web-based listing. My computer is always really slow and on the verge of freezing or crashing so I’ve chosen not to list with my computer. If you decide to list on your computer, go to Poshmark.com and go to the top right of the dashboard and you’ll see a the words $ SELL ON POSHMARK. Click that and you’ll go to the new listing page. You’ll have the opportunity to upload up to 8 photos, add a description, select the size/color/brand and set your price.

On the app it’s very similar. Once you open the app, there’s a camera with the word “Sell” underneath located in the middle of the bottom of the screen. Click that and you’ll be at the app-version of the new listing page. You can upload photos, add the description/size/color/brand and set the price.

Something you need to know about pricing: DO NOT list for the lowest you’d be willing to take the item for. I used to list items at $7-8 each and would get so frustrated when people would offer me $3 (I’d make $0.05 off of that!) So I started listing things at a higher price to accommodate offers. I’ll share more about offers in a later post, but for now make sure you pick a reasonable price that allows wiggle room for people to offer lower.

For what it’s worth, I usually turn on Netflix (click here for some of my recommendations!), sit next to the pile of photographed items, and then list them. When I’ve listed an item, I put it on the other side of me. At some point I look like I’m sitting on a throne of clothes.

FIVE: PUT YOUR ITEMS IN A PLACE YOU’LL REMEMBER

Just today I had to contact a buyer because I couldn’t find this one pair of shoes she purchased. I’ve seen them, I know I have. But I cannot for the life of me FIND THEM. Make sure you keep them in a box or a bag or a special place in your closet. I’ve refined my inventory system, and I’ll share that soon! Keep everything together so you’ll know exactly where to go when you need to ship them.

Some helpful tips when it comes to listing on Poshmark:

  • Always disclose any damage or flaws to the item, both in writing and in pictures.
  • Make sure you always take pictures of brand and size labels and other details that make the item appealing.
  • Use natural light whenever you can!
  • Always fill out the brand in your listing. A lot of people search for brands!
  • Share to Pinterest! You have the option of sharing to a variety of social media platforms, but I think Pinterest is the best option – often times when I’m searching for something, what I’m really seeing is a Poshmark listing via Pinterest!
  • Don’t list your item for the lowest price you want to take. Give it some wiggle room.

Sorry it’s taken me so long to keep this going, but I’m really glad I’ve waited. In the past 4 months my knowledge of Poshmark has probably doubled and I’m glad I can share all of this with you!

My last post will be answering questions my friends have asked me, so if you have a question about Poshmark drop me a comment!

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The Poshmark Series: Poshmark vs. other options

Welcome to the second installment of The Poshmark Series, where I’m walking y’all through how to make some moolah on Poshmark. You can read the intro post here, or you can keep scrolling to find out why I recommend Poshmark over other reselling options.

Check out my closet here, and sign up for Poshmark here with my code BWCTE for $5 credit towards your first purchase!ย 

How Poshmark compares to other selling platforms // stephanieorefice.net

Poshmark VS. ThredUp

ThredUp is an online consignment store. They send you a big bag, you shove it full of high-quality name brand items and send it in. Prior to them sorting the bag you can pay a fee to have anything they won’t accept returned to you, or you could forgo that expense and they’ll discard the unaccepted clothing. They take the shipping charge off of what your bag is worth and then they give you a ThredUp balance of that amount. After two weeks or so you can redeem it for a visa gift card sent via the mail. The waiting period is probably in hopes that you’ll choose instead to spend it on their site.

ThredUp is better than Poshmark if you have piles of clothing you’re on the verge of donating and making $0. If you have a bunch of clothes you want out of your house ASAP, then ThredUp is the best option for you. You can join with my link and receive off your first purchase.

Poshmark is better than ThredUp if you are wanting to have control of the money you make and you have the time/space to dedicate to clothes you’re waiting to sell. Your items may not sell immediately, but you get to choose the price and you get to control how low you’re willing to sell them.

Here’s why I choose Poshmark over ThredUp: I once found a pair of Athleta leggings at the bins. I only paid 75 cents or so for them. They weren’t in my size, but I thought they were a pretty good find. This was pre-Poshmark for me, so I sent them to ThredUp expecting to make some good money off of it. They gave me $4ish dollars for the leggings, and within 24 hours they had sold them for $54. No. Thank. You.

Poshmark VS. eBay

I have been selling my old Victoria’s Secret PINK sweatpants on eBay since… well, forever. Most of my sweats came from various thrift stores, so I tend to acquire overflowing drawers full, then I’ll sell a bunch and then re-fill the drawers. Most people know how eBay works, but here’s an overview just in case. You can list your item to sell or auction and it’s seen by a lot of people. Buyers can bid and outbid and they have a bit of a choice over how much they’re willing to pay. You, of course, can set the startingย bid or buy it now price.

Where ThredUp is the middle man between buyers and sellers, eBay is less so. You are in charge of determining shipping costs and deciding which shipping method to use and invoicing the buyer, unless you have a set shipping fee.

eBay is better than Poshmark if you want to sell a variety of items. Poshmark is strictly clothing, shoes, accessories & NWT makeup items. If you have lotions, trinkets, etc. eBay is your way to go. It also is more widely known, so your potential audience is much greater.

Poshmark is better than eBay if you don’t want to deal with the hassle of shipping. I’ll talk about this more in a later post, but they charge a flat shipping rate of $6.95 for 2-3 day delivery up to 5 lbs. The buyer automatically pays the shipping cost and your only hassle is making sure you have the correct packaging.

Here’s why I choose Poshmark over eBay: There were a pair of NWT Old Navy jeans that had been sitting in my Poshmark closet, unsold. I’d picked them up at the Bins and I decided I just wanted them gone.ย Shipping is confusing, and even though I’d weighed the jeans beforehand when I went to buy the postage, I ended up paying almost exactly what the buyer had sent me to cover the whole transaction – meaning I sent away a brand new pair of jeans and made less than a dollar on them. I’m sure there’s a learning curve, but I’m not down to lose a bunch of money while I figure it out.

Poshmark vs Vinted, Mercari, other clothes reselling sites/apps

Vinted is similar to Poshmark, but online. They have forums and encourage a lot of user engagement. There’s just not a huge buyer audience there. There’s a reason you won’t find a J. Crew store in a little Main Street shop in the middle of nowhere. If you’re selling a product you want people to buy, you should probably sell it where the buyers are. This is why so many big name stores have been closing lately. The buyers are not walking into their doors, the buyers are shopping online.

As for the other reselling sites and apps, I just don’t have time to manage that. Cross posting, making sure the inventories are accurate.. I just have not the time. Instead of spreading my energy thin by learning a zillion different selling tools, I’ve chosen to focus on ONE: Poshmark. If you want to learn more, here is a post about selling on Mercari and here is one about selling on Vinted.

So now that I’ve shared with you why I choose to use Poshmark over other platforms, join me next Friday for the next installment in The Poshmark Series, which is going to be all about getting started – the lingo and the basics! As always, hit me up with any questions you may have because the last post in the series is going to be full of YOUR questions!

 

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